Of mice and men chapter 2 analysis. Of Mice and Men Chapter 2 2019-03-03

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Of Mice and Men Chapter 2 Quotes Page 2

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

Lennie repeatedly interrupts George as he tells this story, but insists that George finish it to the end. This stage technique applies to Steinbeck's descriptions as well as his dialogue. He is later identified as Candy, and his only friend is an old, blind, foul-smelling sheepdog that follows him around the ranch. Nobody wants to be apart from family in hard times like these. Candy tells the men a little about the boss and how he mistreats the stable buck when he's angry since the stable buck is African American. Slim, a friendly worker, asks George about their previous work experience. GradeSaver, 30 November 2008 Web.


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Of Mice and Men Chapter 2

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

During this discussion, Lennie gets excited and before going to dinner asks George to ask Slim for one of his pups. When the boss asks about their skills and previous employment, George speaks for Lennie to prevent him from revealing his lack of intelligence. Although, when the old pair still has experience and skill to bring to the table he can still be used effectively. Carlson comes into the bunkhouse later, complaining about Candy's dog who is old, odorous, and useless. Candy cleans up around the ranch despite the fact that he's missing a hand.

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Of Mice and Men Chapter 2 Quotes Page 2

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

She doesn't even receive a name, she dresses garishly and talks provocatively. In this chapter we learn that is a mean little guy who was a and who is recently married. After this outburst, George feels ashamed. George excepts that as a legitimate answer as well. This section also immediately and painfully establishes the cruel, predatory nature of the world. Each character have attributes and characteristics that differed from one another.

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Of Mice and Men Chapter 2

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

Lennie attempts to speak for himself, aping phrases that George has spoken, but sounds completely ridiculous. Speaking of the Vaseline-filled glove, pay attention to how often and how variedly Steinbeck references hands in this Chapter and throughout the book. Another theme that seemed to be introduced was Sexism. John Steinbeck's novel Of Mice and Men is a classic of English literature. Major points Of The Chapter Their late arrival at the farm angers the boss and his son which is basically the reason there's all this conflict in the bunkhouse early on.


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Of Mice and Men Chapter 2 Quotes Page 2

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

He is tall, has long, black hair combed straight back, wears denim jeans and jacket, and walks with an authoritative air about him, setting him apart as a skilled worker and craftsman. Everyone around the Ranch looks down on Curley's wife. The story follows farm hands Lenny and George. As the boss asks questions about their previous work experience, he notices that George is doing all the talking. He suggests that Candy put his dog out of his misery and take one of the puppies that Slim's dog just birthed.

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Of Mice and Men: Chapter 2 Summary

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

The atmosphere of Chapter Two is immediately hostile and uncomfortable: George suspects that his bed is infested, the Boss suspects that George and Lennie are trying to pull a fast one, Candy is miserable and decrepit, Curley is looking for a fight, Curley's wife is vamping around suspiciously. George gets angry because he sees bug killing formula near the bed he was assigned and thinks that there's something wrong with the beds they're being offered. George replies that Lennie is his cousin and was kicked in the head by a horse when he was young, so George has to look out for him. In this chapter, we meet most of the characters that George and Lennie interact with for the rest of the story. Shortly after the boss leaves, his son, Curley, enters looking for his dad. Their behavior strikes the boss as suspicious, and he asks why George feels the need to take such good care of his companion. Slim introduces the two men to another field hand, Carlson, and shares that his dog had nine puppies last night, four of which he had to drowned so that the others could live.

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SparkNotes: Of Mice and Men: Section 2

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

The Bunkhouse In chapter two, we travel with George Milton and Lennie Small to their new job at the ranch. To be able to link events to key themes through out the chapter and also how certain colours represent different feelings. George and Lennie have a very strange relationship. When the boss wonders why they left their last job, George tells him that they were digging a cesspool and completed the work. As they prepare to sleep, George reminds Lennie not to say a word during their interview with the boss the following day.

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Of Mice and Men: Chapter 2 Summary

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

Candy tells George and Lennie that Slim and Curley's wife have been spending time together, suggesting that there is an affair between them. Trouble on the Ranch Once the boss leaves, George reprimands Lennie for speaking when he was not supposed to, claiming the boss is suspicious of them now. Curley, a thin, young curly-haired man wearing a work glove on one hand, insists that Lennie respond to his questions. He doesn't like George answering questions for Lennie either. On one level, he is simply describing an evening among itinerant workers in a realistic way; on another level, the actions and personae of these workers take on a larger, almost mythic significance. Carlson proposes shooting Candy's crippled dog and replacing it with one of the puppies.

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Of Mice and Men Chapter 2

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

She shows this when she visits the bunkhouse with the excuse of searching for Curley. The small boxes given to each worker for their possessions shows in depth the limited amount of items they have. Candy notes that Curley was recently married to a local beauty and that he has become more cocky ever since. Therefore, her sex acquires no power in terms of work and ideas on the ranch. This is unusual but is a symbol of their sexual relationship shown off to make himself seem superior and greater than. Ever since the girl in weed George is always thinking how their actions could backfire and someone could lie and get them canned.

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Of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

of mice and men chapter 2 analysis

George and Lennie enter and first encounter Candy, who provides some description of the ranch, including a reference to the African-American named Crooks. Candy returns with his old sheepdog, and George snaps at him for eavesdropping. Soon she appears in the bunkhouse, looking for Curley. The boss, a stocky man in a Stetson hat, flannel shirt and boots with spurs, employs the two men anyways, and Lennie manages to stay quiet as George arranges their employment. Soon, the laborers return from the fields and one named Slim enters the bunkhouse. And Steinbeck's novel certainly features men rather than women. Slim reports that he drowned four of the puppies immediately because their mother would have been unable to feed them.


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